Bellyfeel » If Alfred Hitchcock Were Alive Today He Would Be An Internet Marketeer

See on Scoop.itSophia Dudésir – Journaliste Transmédia

Hitchcock’s films to me are 100% psychological. I have always wanted to create interactive experiences on a par with the films he made…

Evalir ‘s insight:

Hitchcock, Marketing et Transmedia

See on www.bellyfeel.co.uk

How to tell a great business story

See on Scoop.itStorytelling Communication narrative EVALIR – EVATOURISME

Every business has a story.

 

When I went to Stanford last week to interview Tory Burch about her amazing story (Young woman with no formal education in design and no MBA builds a $2.5 billion business from scratch in less than a decade!), the University folks asked me if I would let them interview me about, yes, the art of storytelling.

 

Over 29 years of writing for Fortune, I’ve learned a lot about storytelling. And today, with social media driving every business, telling a compelling story is more essential for businesses than ever.

 

Do you want to know how to tell a great story? I explain on this short video clip:

See on postcards.blogs.fortune.cnn.com

Storytelling Illustrations Show the Beauty of Childhood

See on Scoop.itStorytelling Communication narrative EVALIR – EVATOURISME

Durban, South-Africa based illustrator Colwyn Thomas creates some of the most beautiful illustrations of childhood we’ve ever seen. He begins each design as a pencil drawing and then converts it into vector lines. Finally, he adds colors in Photoshop, using scanned in textures such as coffee stains or various papers until he achieves his desired look.

 

The first illustration in this post is called The Whale. When asked by Empty Kingdom what he wanted its viewers to take away from it he said, « The relationship between the wild and man is an important one for me. I occasionally work as a guide in a big five wilderness area and there are encounters one has there, with the game, with the place itself, that give me a clear sense of being something other than human. As if there was something to define ourselves as first, before we classified ourselves as human. There’s such wonder and humility in finding your self a part of the world as opposed to an observer of it. So in The Whale it’s not so much a whale and a little human making separate observations of one another, but two…creatures sharing a moment. »

See on www.mymodernmet.com